What are megaliths made of?

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Re: What are megaliths made of?

Postby Boreades » 9:19 pm

For those with an interest in Ley Lines and all that, an event in the centre of the Megalithic Universe (Wiltshire)

Fri, 5th July 2013, 19:30 – 21:30 at Poulshot Village Hall, The Green, Poulshot, SN10 1SD (near Devizes)

Kennet BeeKeeper Association is hosting a talk: "Bees, ley lines & where bees are kept" - by Roger Patterson (British BeeKeepers Association Committee & Trustee)

Description:
Do bees dowse? Have you ever wondered where to best site your hives? Are ley lines just a load of hocus pocus or might they be something to consider? Interestingly, ley lines were discovered in modern times in 1921 by Alfred Watkins, who was a founder member of Herefordshire BKA!!! He was also a keen photographer and invented and patented a light exposure meter called the "Watkins Bee Meter" on account of its small size. Roger Patterson will take a look at different apiaries mainly at home and a few abroad. He will share his thoughts on siting hives and comment on some of the issues raised.

Contact christine.compston@gmail.com
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Re: What are megaliths made of?

Postby Marko » 7:33 am

Malmaison wrote:In any case it seems travellers always have to have two routes, for summer and winter use respectively.

So do animals and birds.

Boreades wrote:Likewise, if we could talk to pigeons and a few other birds, they would tell us how the electro-ferrite crystals embedded in their forebrains allow them to detect and resolve magnetic variations well enough to be a built-in GPS.

Humans can, in the right circumstances, wake up and tune into this low-level awareness of EMF variations. If that sounds a bit yogic, perhaps it's meant to.

I don't follow this electro-magnetic thread. Bird migration routes cross deserts as well as mountain ranges and hills, generally in a north-south-ish direction and avoiding, it would seem, large stretches of water

Image

Sheerwaters and Arctic terns are the exception. Their routes are noticeably circular.

Image

The maps ignore the UK entirely! Yet the trans-Asian route from the east and the African routes from the south converge at the south and south-east coasts so they're not an accurate guide.

Bird-watchers say rivers and major roads act as navigational markers. The glint makes them highly visible so that sounds a reasonable claim. Interestingly, the most outstanding Megalithic markers are cursuses, parallel lines that covered large tracts of countryside (e.g. Cranbourne Chase, near the south coast at Dorset). I wonder if cursuses acted as markers for birds too?
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Re: What are megaliths made of?

Postby Boreades » 10:49 pm

I stand corrected - the birds that fly the longest migration routes are clearly not following straight lines. It seems much more likely that they are following the prevailing winds.
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Re: What are megaliths made of?

Postby hvered » 11:43 am

The MoD no less have been sold dud bomb/explosives detectors described as "glorified dowsing rods that have no basis in reality" http://doubtfulnews.com/2013/07/bolton- ... detectors/

The surprising revelation that the scam went on for a decade must be down to a very human tendency to believe what experts say. The 'proof' is that even though it's claimed, probably correctly, that lives were lost as a result of the scam, the MoD went on believing in the efficacy of the dud devices.
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Re: What are megaliths made of?

Postby Boreades » 11:16 pm

I wonder what the migration routes look like when the continents are condensed down to Pangea-sized?

Image
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Re: What are megaliths made of?

Postby Boreades » 12:24 am

Or this, so we can include the curlew and shearwaters in Australasia

Image
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Re: What are megaliths made of?

Postby hvered » 6:21 pm

Pangea is a hypothetical continent, there's no evidence for it having ever existed. What is known to have existed, and which would directly affect birds (indeed all animals, including humans) are magnetic reversals.

There are so many contradictions and disagreements on magnetic pole reversals, it's hard to make head 'n' tail of the subject. Dowsers may have a better handle on it.
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Re: What are megaliths made of?

Postby Boreades » 12:04 am

Magnetic pole reversals gets a mention in an article I stumbled past a few days ago while hunting calendars. Something along the lines of "Worlds In Collision", but fingering c.800BC as the era when all hell broke loose (sic) and we lost 360 day years, only to get a period of chaos from which our calendars have never fully recovered.
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Re: What are megaliths made of?

Postby Mick Harper » 1:39 am

Some new and interesting stuff on whether the Stonehenge sarsens are from Preselli (by hand of man) can be found on the Portal here http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=28658 Our old sparring partner Brian John is involved so don't expect strict impartiality. You'll find the best account towards the bottom by another old sparring partner of ours, Andy B.
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Re: What are megaliths made of?

Postby hvered » 11:19 am

Now geologist John Downes and geomorphologists Dyfed Elis-Gruffydd and Brian John have examined the site very carefully, and have come to the conclusion that there are no traces of a Neolithic quarry here. Instead, they interpret the rocky debris found during the archaeological dig as entirely natural accumulations resulting from intermittent rockfalls over a long period of time.

What's most fascinating is that the geologists can't seem to agree whether a site that has been exhaustively studied for how many years?... decades? is or isn't natural. If the bluestones were glacial erratics, presumably the Preseli-is-special must be a modern notion and would be a good example of making facts 'fit in' with the theory.

One wonders though about other rocky valleys, clefts and craters and their possible uses. But in any case, how a series of almost identikit conically shaped tors can be described as natural is quite remarkable.
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