Megalithic service stations?

Current topics

Re: Megalithic service stations?

Postby Mick Harper » 6:59 pm

Yes, now work out why.
Mick Harper
 
Posts: 861
Joined: 10:28 am

Re: Megalithic service stations?

Postby Mick Harper » 7:02 pm

Since the two hills are precisely the same height, it would be good to know what you can see from where. Pop out and have a look, Borry.
Mick Harper
 
Posts: 861
Joined: 10:28 am

Re: Megalithic service stations?

Postby Boreades » 7:57 pm

Sorry, right now the local roads are jammed solid with Summer Solstice Sightseers, and it's not safe to drive. Especially after a full load of cider.

T'will have to wait until we nip down to Honeystreet Saw Mill, just down from t'hill, for more timber for more raised beds for M'lady Boreades prize-winning strawberries.
Boreades
 
Posts: 1995
Joined: 2:35 pm

Re: Megalithic service stations?

Postby Boreades » 12:34 pm

I've had a look. Traffic was shocking. Fortunately, I was able to wave my TME VIP card at the friendly Wiltshire Constabulary's representatives, who recognised me as a fit member of a regularly organised society, and they let me through immediately.

Anyway, from Milk Hill you can see Giant's Grave, in a fairly good alignment on the reciprocal bearing to Tan Hill.

Milk Hill also sits on the line from Silbury to Casterley Camp.

Image

Some of the long-term TME inmates might remember my attempt to interest the TME society in these "triplets" that seem to occur quite regularly.
Boreades
 
Posts: 1995
Joined: 2:35 pm

Re: Megalithic service stations?

Postby Boreades » 2:46 pm

Royston wrote: Pitch is one of the most useful and oldest building materials and, unlike the Dorset chalkland, is easily accessible in desert regions.


Pitch is also easily accessible in Dorset. Along with oil tar and shale.

The Kimmeridge oil shale was used for making armlets in Iron Age and Roman times and this industry was on a substantial scale. Objects of Kimmeridge oil shale have been found on the continent, as far away as Switzerland. ... The Kimmeridge oil shale was used extensively by Iron Age British tribesmen and the Romans for armlets. These were made on a primitive lathe. The residual central disks are known as Kimmeridge coal money. Large numbers have been found. With one of them is shown a beach pebble of oil shale that I polished with carborundum paper and metal polish. This gives an idea of the polished appearance. It is easy to polish and the material seems to have been much valued in antiquity.
http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~imw/Kimme ... tm#KOS-2-1


Image
Boreades
 
Posts: 1995
Joined: 2:35 pm

Re: Megalithic service stations?

Postby Mick Harper » 3:05 pm

Since this is also Britain's first (and I believe still biggest) onshore oilfield I wonder if it was discovered by geologists or by esotericists. Borry, ask around, can you?
Mick Harper
 
Posts: 861
Joined: 10:28 am

Re: Megalithic service stations?

Postby Boreades » 3:09 pm

It was discovered by the Durotriges (if not earlier)
Boreades
 
Posts: 1995
Joined: 2:35 pm

Re: Megalithic service stations?

Postby Mick Harper » 3:11 pm

No, it wasn't. Definitions are all-important in this game.
Mick Harper
 
Posts: 861
Joined: 10:28 am

Re: Megalithic service stations?

Postby Boreades » 3:15 pm

You better do your own asking-around then.

Stonehenge as an oil terminal would be a novel idea.
Boreades
 
Posts: 1995
Joined: 2:35 pm

Re: Megalithic service stations?

Postby TisILeclerc » 3:32 pm

I wonder what the origin of the word Kimmeridge is?

I can understand the ridge bit I think but Kimmer?
TisILeclerc
 
Posts: 786
Joined: 11:40 am

PreviousNext

Return to Index

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest