Megalithic masons

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Re: Megalithic masons

Postby Mick Harper » 12:07 am

I have changed all these colours to preserve masonic secrecy.
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Re: Megalithic masons

Postby Boreades » 8:51 pm

Surely If we found Hattie a Ladies Lodge to join the problem would be solved?
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Re: Megalithic masons

Postby TisILeclerc » 2:37 pm

The Daily Mail has discovered a world of Templars down a rabbit hole. The Templars were apparently destroyed by leaders of the free world.

An interesting interpretation up there in newspeak terms with Freedom Fries and other concoctions no doubt.

Once used as a ceremonial spot for the followers of a secretive religious sect, these are the underground caves offering safe haven after leaders of the free world brutally dismantled the group's power base


Still, the pictures are pretty. I wonder if they got the rabbits to do the digging for them?

Image

Image

Image

And finally the rabbit hole. And they say we are running out of space to build houses eh?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... shire.html

No wonder the white rabbit was in a hurry. He wouldn't want to be late for a meeting of these characters.

Did Lewis Carroll know a thing or two?
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Re: Megalithic masons

Postby Boreades » 11:57 pm

Just recently I had cause to visit DC Symbols. A rather excellent website on the Masonic and Kabbalistic Symbols in the Washington, D.C. Map. I commend it to the TME house. The author puts a lot of emphasis on things Egyptian. But some of the names and numbers he mentions ring a TME-shaped bell.

Consider the placement of geodetic centers on the globe. A geodetic center is the 'navel' from which measurements are made in a certain culture. Today, the accepted center is located at Greenwich, England. Apparently the Romans had a stone that is still in London that they used for measurements there. In Egypt the geodetic center was once located at Thebes (Karnak Temple), and in Greece it had been at Delphi.

and
Curiously we find that if we divide ninety by seven, then multiply by 2 we get Thebes latitude, multiply by 3 and we arrive at the latitude of Delphi, and (90/7) x 4 equals the latitude of Greenwich. Delphi is at 38 27 north latitude, about 38.5 degrees. You will note that Jefferson located Monticello at 38 north, and that the north point of the district is located very near 39 north; one degree straddling the Delphi latitude. Monterrey, Mexico is parallel to Thebes.


Those with memories might just remember our own chats about fractional latitudes.

At Stonehenge, the sun rises about 38.57 degrees north of east at the summer solstice and about 38.57 degrees south of east at the winter solstice.
i.e. 3/7ths of a 90 degree quandrant.

Whereas Stonehenge is significant for solar reasons, Avebury is astronomically aligned. Avebury is also one of the ancient geodetic centers of the world positioned on exact latitude fractions. (Greenwich being the newer geodetic center on a similar latitude)

Giza is 1/3rd (30 degrees) of the 90 degree quadrant (equator to pole)
Thebes is 2/7ths (25.7 deg)
Avebury is 4/7ths (51.42 deg) or 360/7
360/7 is 51.42857142857143

Put that in a geosite as the latitude and what do you get?
e.g. http://www.findlatitudeandlongitude.com ... 38&zoom=16

Image

For me, that was a real gob-smacker. Usually with my feeble attempts at maps, alignments and meridians, places are fairly close, or maybe close enough if you are optimistic or naively hopeful. Avebury, however, is none of these. It is absolutely spot-on, to an astonishing degree of precision. Whether any of the designers of Washington DC knew the significance of Avebury and Stonhenge is probably a whole topic of its own. Perhaps there are many more ancient sites that play with the ratios of 3,4,7 and 12?
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Re: Megalithic masons

Postby TisILeclerc » 8:21 pm

Here's one for you to play with Borry.

They've discovered what they think is a henge on Eston Hills on the south bank of the Tees. There is an old iron age camp in the same area and the place was mined in the nineteenth century but this is the first suggestion of a henge.

The commentary seems to be a bit garbled but that could be because of the paper it's reported in which is the Evening Gazette. Once a very good newspaper but today little more than a semi literate picture rag which keeps going for the sake of it.

Exciting new discoveries on the Eston Hills dates life on Teesside at more than 10,000 years old.

Archaeologists digging on the hills have discovered what’s believed to be an ancient henge - evidence of mesolithic life, along with flint and other materials, dating back to around 8,500BC.


What attracts me to the article in particular is the drone footage which for a moment shows Roseberry Topping in the background. The henge would have had a perfect view of the hill and of course the other way around.

Most test pits uncovered flint tools, with three hearths and a post hole uncovered. Further geophysical work needs to be carried out to identify other features.

But the 90m diameter henge - which was discovered after a layer of peat and then clay was found on top of more peat - is the most impressive.

“That points to a society,” said Adam. “The number of people that would be needed to move that amount of earth would be incredible.

“It points to a much larger settlement than we thought.


http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/teess ... n-13497696
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Re: Megalithic masons

Postby Mick Harper » 8:34 pm

How near the river is it and how wide is the river at this point? We have not dealt with this much but such places must have been animal nodal points. Roseberry Topping becomes more and more mysteriously significant. The archaeos of course will ignore it.
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Re: Megalithic masons

Postby TisILeclerc » 10:29 pm

I'm not sure about the distances etc. But I would imagine Eston is about two and a half miles to the river bank and the river is about 220 yards wide. It only gets much wider at the mouth.

What is an animal nodal point?
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Re: Megalithic masons

Postby Mick Harper » 10:48 pm

Well, the argument goes, most of the trappings of megalithia are for long distance trading which is largely conducted by animals or, in the case of droving, is animals. The crossing of major rivers requires either infrastructure in the construction and maintenance of fords or, if the brutes are going to swim for it -- as they often did e.g. the Menai Straits -- then a certain amount of pausing for the big push is required.

Actually, thinking about it, also waiting for other pack trains since, I think I am right in saying, it's more the merrier when conducting animals across water. It follows that there will be some sort of megalithic evidence on both banks, though admittedly I don't see either henges or toppings having a role in this specifically. On the other hand, if this is 'the Tees crossing', then we might expect navigational markers pointing the way to it and henges and toppings do, ex hypothesi, have a role in that.
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Re: Megalithic masons

Postby Boreades » 11:07 pm

TisILeclerc wrote:What is an animal nodal point?


Some of these still echo down to us in their placenames. A couple near me are Swinbrook and Oxford.

Not that there are many swine or oxen swimming the river these days. More likely to be drunken students. Such larks Pip!
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Re: Megalithic masons

Postby Mick Harper » 11:21 pm

Fords do not get nearly as much attention as they should. For instance apart from London Bridge, I believe there were no bridges across the Thames between its mouth and Abingdon until the nineteenth century (somebody check, but it's something of the sort). Actually this is strange, technically speaking, and suggests that fords may have been more profitable than bridges and the latter were deliberately suppressed by riparian landowners. This was certainly the case with London Bridge itself.
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