Fire and Ice.

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Re: Fire and Ice.

Postby Boreades » 1:37 pm

I didn't know that either. If that's the case, what with Africa (reportably) being more prone to Communicable/Infectious Diseases (than Europe), surely there should be more variety of blood groups in Africa than anywhere else?
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Re: Fire and Ice.

Postby TisILeclerc » 5:15 pm

Looks like I'm right and wrong.

According to this site blood groups change because of diseases.

But, they say that 'A' is the oldest and 'O' the youngest.

As I'm 'A neg' I wonder where that puts me. Probably at the back of the class as usual.

http://www.livescience.com/33528-why-bl ... tible.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style ... 22054.html

This second article claims that 'O' type blood is the universal donor. I'm sure he's wrong there. 'O' negative is the universal donor, I think.

And here's another site

http://www.viewzone.com/blood.html

'A' is high among Scandinavians and the Sami people but also Blackfoot Indians of North America and is found among Australian Aborigines.

Very strange distribution pattern.
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Re: Fire and Ice.

Postby Boreades » 6:57 pm

Yes, a strange distribution pattern...

The highest frequencies of A are found in small, unrelated populations, especially the Blackfoot Indians of Montana (30-35%), the Australian Aborigines (many groups are 40-53%), and the Lapps, or Saami people, of Northern Scandinavia (50-90%).

... but does it coincide with folk who traditionally had a nomadic or herding lifestyle? That correlation clearly breaks down when we look at Africa.
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Re: Fire and Ice.

Postby TisILeclerc » 7:59 pm

Perhaps it has to do with geography.

The Lapps, Scandinavians, Saami and Blackfoot are in the northern hemisphere. Quite far north for the first three.

Perhaps the Blackfoot connection has something to do with your out of America idea.

The Aborigines of Australia are at the extreme south of the southern hemisphere.

Is there something about extreme polar latitudes that could influence the success of blood groups?

I know that Australia is not quite polar but it is isolated which may have helped.
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Re: Fire and Ice.

Postby Boreades » 8:24 pm

There is something about the ginger nuts being related to northern latitudes.
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Re: Fire and Ice.

Postby TisILeclerc » 8:38 pm

They need the heat

Although I don't think the Lapps are quite ginger nuts although they might like them.
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Re: Fire and Ice.

Postby Boreades » 10:49 pm

I thought it was supposed to be because of an absence of light?
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Re: Fire and Ice.

Postby TisILeclerc » 9:09 am

That's mushrooms isn't it?
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Re: Fire and Ice.

Postby TisILeclerc » 9:31 pm

Popular thinking tells us that the ice age covered Europe and everyone moved to Spain for the winter.

However, we now know that there were refuges in Siberia where mammoths and other animals survived in 'refuges' and a human skull was unearthed not so long ago.

Norway also had refuges where trees survived. With trees we get other vegetation, insects and I would suggest animals, including humans. Pollen from Iceland was also found so there may well have been a refuge there. A recent article has stated that volcanic activity in Antarctica helped animal life to survive there so there's every possibility that volcanic Iceland also had animal survivors.

Now it appears that Ireland had a refuge as a dna project has been done on the Irish mountain hare which proves that it is not related to other hares and must have survived in this Irish refuge. Apologies to all hareophobes at the mention of the word hare.

All genetic data seems to suggest that the Irish hare is more genetically divergent than previously thought. Observed levels of divergence and haplotypic diversity can not be explained by recent colonisation. Instead, the most parsimonious explanation is that the Irish hare survived the last glacial maximum in refugia possibly in the southern parts of Ireland and/or other areas further south now covered by water.


http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/irishhareg ... report.pdf

As we know the south of England escaped the ice that troubled the north and Scotland and it may be that even Doggerland escaped the ice. I can't see the ice free bit stopping at Norwich and not continuing across for a wee bit.

So perhaps there was a population of people still living in the south of Britain, as the Irish article points out sea level was much lower then so there was more land than there would be today. Perhaps they were all architects planning a Stonehenge kind of enterprise to impress the sunlovers when they returned from the Costas.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news ... vironment/

http://sciencenordic.com/spruce-and-pin ... age-norway

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg ... t-ice-age/
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Re: Fire and Ice.

Postby Boreades » 1:08 am

According to Live Science back in 2013:

A piece of the famous Halley's comet likely slammed into Earth in A.D. 536, blasting so much dust into the atmosphere that the planet cooled considerably, a new study suggests. This dramatic climate shift is linked to drought and famine around the world, which may have made humanity more susceptible to "Justinian's plague" in A.D. 541-542 — the first recorded emergence of the Black Death in Europe. The new results come from an analysis of Greenland ice that was laid down between A.D. 533 and 540. The ice cores record large amounts of atmospheric dust during this seven-year period, not all of it originating on Earth. "I have all this extraterrestrial stuff in my ice core," study leader Dallas Abbott, of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, told LiveScience.


http://www.livescience.com/42048-halley ... amine.html

Could this be the fabled Waste Land of Arthurian legend?
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